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The NRDC baseload twitter storm

The release of a Brattle report by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) resulted in a Twitter storm and much commentary over the meaning of ‘baseload’. Mark Diesendorf had pushed back against the term more than 10 years ago. But some anti-coal proponents...

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The rigour of the Jacobson et al. RE plan

UPDATE: 26 August 2017 - A response to Jacobson et al.'s response has been published with further detail here. Completely decarbonising energy systems is a difficult and complex problem. Wind and solar have the benefit of modularity, falling costs, and scalability....

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Synchronous grids and inertia

The Australian NEM spans five states and 4,500 km and has around 260 registered generators, all of which, when online, are synchronous machines spinning in near-exact synchronization at close to 50 Hz across the network (the island state of Tasmania is connected via...

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Australia’s strategic oil reserve

With the current political debates in Australia around energy and climate policy, it’s easy to neglect the sleeper of Australia’s energy policy - the lack of an oil strategic reserve. The IEA was established in November 1974 in response to the first Middle Eastern oil...

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The speciation of technology

In the evolving technology space, there can be a tendency to assume that a single class of technology will come to dominate. The stand-out example is Tony Seba’s projection that all new road vehicles—buses, cars, vans, trucks —will be entirely electric by 2030, and...

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Interesting and counter-intuitive historical perspective on nuclear costs. Worth a read.

If Radical Innovation Makes Nuclear Power Expensive, Why Do We Think It Will Make Nuclear Cheap? via @forbes https://t.co/blgOKRGc2H

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